Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Random Stat thread....
#21
ouch
Reply
Thanks given by:
#22
So the next time an irrational Blue Jays fan wants a struggling pitcher traded for a bag of balls, there's some hope.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#23
Well the Jays once traded a player for himself so anything is possible. Wink

In 2005 The Jays traded John McDonald to Detroit at the deadline for a player to be named later. In November the Jays decided they wanted McDonald back so the Tigers sent him and cash back to Toronto to complete the original trade.

So the Jays traded John McDonald for a PTBNL and the PTBNL wound up being John McDonald.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#24
(2017-01-05, 12:59 PM)Andrew Wrote: Well the Jays once traded a player for himself so anything is possible. Wink

In 2005 The Jays traded John McDonald to Detroit at the deadline for a player to be named later. In November the Jays decided they wanted McDonald back so the Tigers sent him and cash back to Toronto to complete the original trade.

So the Jays traded John McDonald for a PTBNL and the PTBNL wound up being John McDonald.
How the hell did the jays manage to get cash back too lol
Reply
Thanks given by:
#25
Did you know that AJ Burnett ranks 30th all time in strikeouts?

http://www.fangraphs.com/leaders.aspx?po...&sort=24,d
Reply
Thanks given by:
#26
(2017-02-20, 11:44 PM)Andrew Wrote: Did you know that AJ Burnett ranks 30th all time in strikeouts?

http://www.fangraphs.com/leaders.aspx?po...&sort=24,d


That surprises me, not because Burnett was good at strikeouts...but because of when he did it.   Pitchers are maxing out at 230ish IP, 35ish starts...when they used to play more games, stay in games longer (more complete games)...you never see guys get over 300 Ks anymore.

Then looking at his career...he doesn't seem to be a standoubt in that area...only topped 200k a few times...only led the league in k's once...and for the first half of his career at least, seemed to miss time on the DL every year.   Didn't seem to have the consistency to bump him up the leader boards.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#27
Yeah I never would've guessed that. But he did have a pretty consistent and healthy career. In 15 seasons between 2001-15 he pitched in fewer than 20 games only once.

If anything, this is proof of how difficult it is for pitchers to stay healthy and, well, good at throwing baseballs.

Was also surprised to see CC Sabathia 22nd all-time in K's. And Felix cracked the top 50 last season at age 30.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#28
I was actually more surprised to see Chuck Finley 29th, than AJ 30th. Never thought of him as a high strikeout guy, but looking at his numbers, it was obviously because I wasn't paying attention lol. 3 200 K seasons, 9 170+ K seasons.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#29
(2017-02-21, 11:21 AM)shadylane Wrote: Yeah I never would've guessed that. But he did have a pretty consistent and healthy career. In 15 seasons between 2001-15 he pitched in fewer than 20 games only once.


A full healthy season, is roughly 30 starts...missing 10 is like 2 months worth.

Indeed, it looks like he stayed healthy from 2008 on...but for the first half of his career, he seemed to spend at least part of the year on the DL, and he missed almost all of 2003.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#30
(2017-02-21, 11:59 AM)Chris D Wrote:
(2017-02-21, 11:21 AM)shadylane Wrote: Yeah I never would've guessed that. But he did have a pretty consistent and healthy career. In 15 seasons between 2001-15 he pitched in fewer than 20 games only once.


A full healthy season, is roughly 30 starts...missing 10 is like 2 months worth.

Indeed, it looks like he stayed healthy from 2008 on...but for the first half of his career, he seemed to spend at least part of the year on the DL, and he missed almost all of 2003.

He didn't miss any full seasons though for 14 of 15 years, With TJ and Labrum surgeries being so common these days, that's something a lot of guys don't accomplish. Sometimes they miss the majority of 2 consecutive seasons due to one injury depending on what time of year it occurs and how quick they come back from it.


For a guy that seemingly was always hurt, he did quite well in the end.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#31
It also has a lot to do with the fact that strikeouts have become much more common over the past 40-ish years due to the changes in thinking and strategy. For the first 100 years of MLB striking out was a sin. Sabermetrics made it much less so and thus they are much more common.

The league wide K% in 1940 was 9.4%. In 1960 it was 13.5%. In 1980 it was 12.5%. It has been in the high teens/low twenty percent range for most of the 2000's. Walter Johnson, considered the most dominant pitcher of his era, had a career* K% of 12.5%. Ian Kennedy, considered a below average at best starter in this era, has a career k% of 21.9%.

So Any list of strikeouts is probably going to be dominated by guys who pitched in the past 20 or so years because its a much higher strikeout environment.


* we only have K% for the last half of his career
Reply
Thanks given by:
#32
.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Reply
Thanks given by: thebest41587
#33
That is one of those stats that sounds impressive but ireally have no idea if it is. You could still be a pretty bad pitcher throwing 1 out of every 3 pitches for a strike lol.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#34
Given its Greg Maddux, I think its pretty impressive.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#35
(2017-02-22, 06:44 PM)Andrew Wrote: It also has a lot to do with the fact that strikeouts have become much more common over the past 40-ish years due to the changes in thinking and strategy. For the first 100 years of MLB striking out was a sin. Sabermetrics made it much less so and thus they are much more common.


* we only have K% for the last half of his career

What does this mean? I tried googling it but am super confused lol
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:
#36
I watched Maddux through his career, and was amazed by what he can do with a baseball...but I think eventually, he started getting the benefit of the doubt from the umps on some the close calls because he is Greg Maddux. he wouldn't get to 3-0, because the 2-0 pitch slightly off the plate would be called a strike.

no evidence to prove such a thing...just anecdotal...but that was my perception.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#37
(2017-03-19, 10:12 PM)Chris D Wrote: I watched Maddux through his career, and was amazed by what he can do with a baseball...but I think eventually, he started getting the benefit of the doubt from the umps on some the close calls because he is Greg Maddux.   he wouldn't get to 3-0, because the 2-0 pitch slightly off the plate would be called a strike.

no evidence to prove such a thing...just anecdotal...but that was my perception.

Veterans often get the benefit of the doubt in many sports.

I wouldn't doubt that theory.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#38
(2017-03-19, 10:11 PM)bicboi Wrote:
(2017-02-22, 06:44 PM)Andrew Wrote: It also has a lot to do with the fact that strikeouts have become much more common over the past 40-ish years due to the changes in thinking and strategy. For the first 100 years of MLB striking out was a sin. Sabermetrics made it much less so and thus they are much more common.

What does this mean? I tried googling it but am super confused lol

Basically, for most of baseball history striking out was considered pretty embarrassing for a hitter. Guys would choke up with 2 strikes and fight off pitches to avoid getting struck out.  Then in the 70's and 80's attitudes started to change. Striking out was not that bad if the reason the guy was striking out was that he was trying to hit a lot of HR's. Guys like Dale Murphy or Reggie Jackson or Mark McGwire would go up there and let it rip at every pitch trying to hit the ball over the fence. And they were successful enough in doing so that the extra strikeouts were seen as acceptable. Strikeouts became to be seen a necessary trade off for power. 

Now everyone tries to hit for power (and rightfully so, it is more effective and valuable) so strikeouts are much more acceptable and common.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#39
It's why Adam Dunn had a career.

led the league in K's four times...in the top 10 in K's 12 times.... .237 career BA, but he hit over 450 HRs. 35th on the career leaderboards...Tied with Canseco, ahead of Yastremski, only 3 behind Winfield...just to give some comparables.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#40
Dunn's career is pretty remarkable. .237 avg, 462 career HR's a 28% K rate and an OBP of .368. He is the epitome of a "three true outcome" player. (thr 3 true outcomes being Strikeout, walk, and HR)
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)