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Accepting new offers while committed...
#1
If you apply to an organization, receive a job offer, but then receive an even better one (like night and day better) from another one, is it rude/inappropriate to tell the first organization that you'll be taking the better offer?

Even if you explain to the first one how much you appreciate the initial offer and that the better one is better for you and your family, is it not unprofessional? Will it not burn professional bridges?
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#2
(2019-05-14, 11:28 PM)bicboi Wrote: If you apply to an organization, receive a job offer, but then receive an even better one (like night and day better) from another one, is it rude/inappropriate to tell the first organization that you'll be taking the better offer?

Even if you explain to the first one how much you appreciate the initial offer and that the better one is better for you and your family, is it not unprofessional? Will it not burn professional bridges?

I think initially there will be some short term disappointment. But if you are open and honest they should understand. 

I am in a similar situation now. My old employer offered me a job to come back with about  50% bump on where I am now. I accepted and signed offer before telling current employer. Now current employer is offering to closely match what my old firm has offered. 

I’ve already signed the offer to return and there are other issues besides $ that my old office is a better fit, but I am trying to be as open as I can. Sometimes it’s hard to communicate what your gut is telling you though.
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#3
I don't understand. If you have not yet accepted the first offer then it's totally ok. If you have then ya, you need to be as up front and diplomatic as you can with them if you plan to un-accept.
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#4
If you haven’t accepted either offer, then take the better offer and simply telling the other one “thanks but no thanks”. People are offered jobs only to turn them down all the time.
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#5
Oh man. Let me take you back to 2005. Been finished school for 2 years. Had a few short-term programming contracts but nothing permanent. 

Had an interview with a small web design company. Very cool offices, got a great vibe from the place. And the work would have been interesting. Pay started off low (which is typical of startups). I didn't get a call back.

Was also in the middle of a VERY LONG interview process to get a government web development job. Like 11 months long. It's frigging ridiculous, women create life in shorter time than the government can hire someone. I had to go to an exam room with computers and a hundred other people and build a website from scratch. Then two rounds of interviews. And months of waiting with no communication in between.

So I finally get the government job. High pay for a junior position. Absolutely shitty, soul-crushing environment. Dumb-as-hammers work. I was actually their second choice but their first choice bailed somewhere along the way. Anyway, I was told I would start in a month.

The very next day the web design startup called me. "You interviewed with us a few months ago, we gave that position to someone else but we have more openings and were hoping you were still available."

I was stupid; I should have asked for a day to think about it. My head was screaming "What do I do??" I turned it down.

I stayed at that absolutely terrible government job for five unbearable years. The pay was decent and work-life balance was fine (haha, half my coworkers never put in a single honest hour of work in an entire year). But it was just miserable. Seriously, I tell everyone to run from public service jobs, they aren't worth it. Maybe when you're older and value stability and a pension but not when you're young. 

I'm not there anymore, moved on to better things thank God. My brain was turning to mush in the public service.

But I still wonder where I'd be if I took that startup job.
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#6
Always do what’s best for you.
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#7
First of all, take the offer that is best for you, even if it means in-accepting one you have already said you will take. At 59 years old, I can tell you that there is no loyalty given by companies to their employees. I have been downsized out of four jobs in my career and it has absolutely nothing to do with performance.
But yes, be diplomatic and be up-front. Nobody expects you to stay in a job because it would be polite to do so.
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#8
As an employer, I've never held it against someone when they've taken a better opportunity than I can give them. People have to do what's best for themselves and their family, and I'd never begrudge that. Heck, I've left jobs or passed up on offers for bigger and better things myself. Just be open and honest about why you're taking the other offer.

And any employer who is petty enough to hold a grudge probably isn't worth working for.
"Hope is not a strategy"
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#9
Ask yourself this.

Would the company think twice about replacing you if a night and day better recruit came through? The very, very short answer is "Nope".

Do what you need to do for you and yours.
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#10
(2019-05-14, 11:28 PM)bicboi Wrote: If you apply to an organization, receive a job offer, but then receive an even better one (like night and day better) from another one, is it rude/inappropriate to tell the first organization that you'll be taking the better offer?

Even if you explain to the first one how much you appreciate the initial offer and that the better one is better for you and your family, is it not unprofessional? Will it not burn professional bridges?

Which job would you prefer if the offers were equal? If it’s the first one, ask if they’ll match. If not, they’re the ones saying no. Like it’s been said before - always do what’s best for you. They’d replace you for someone better in a heartbeat, so should you.
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#11
For conversation sake, what if the initial organizationjust doesn't have the resources to match a better offer? If one knows this and still negotiates, is it not a shitty thing to do to the organization or is bargaining offers considered normal?
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#12
I don't know the org or the work required but two things jump out. Companies always have more money than they say they do. If they can not offer a competitive rate, will they even be able to spend the money required for you to do your job properly?
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#13
(2019-05-15, 12:36 PM)ZappaScores Wrote: I don't know the org or the work required but two things jump out. Companies always have more money than they say they do. If they can not offer a competitive rate, will they even be able to spend the money required for you to do your job properly?

It's a uni, they have to apply for grants for funding and to pay people every year. Pretty much a non-profit in terms of how they get their funds Sad
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#14
(2019-05-15, 07:58 AM)Hieremias Wrote: Oh man. Let me take you back to 2005. Been finished school for 2 years. Had a few short-term programming contracts but nothing permanent. 

Had an interview with a small web design company. Very cool offices, got a great vibe from the place. And the work would have been interesting. Pay started off low (which is typical of startups). I didn't get a call back.

Was also in the middle of a VERY LONG interview process to get a government web development job. Like 11 months long. It's frigging ridiculous, women create life in shorter time than the government can hire someone. I had to go to an exam room with computers and a hundred other people and build a website from scratch. Then two rounds of interviews. And months of waiting with no communication in between.

So I finally get the government job. High pay for a junior position. Absolutely shitty, soul-crushing environment. Dumb-as-hammers work. I was actually their second choice but their first choice bailed somewhere along the way. Anyway, I was told I would start in a month.

The very next day the web design startup called me. "You interviewed with us a few months ago, we gave that position to someone else but we have more openings and were hoping you were still available."

I was stupid; I should have asked for a day to think about it. My head was screaming "What do I do??" I turned it down.

I stayed at that absolutely terrible government job for five unbearable years. The pay was decent and work-life balance was fine (haha, half my coworkers never put in a single honest hour of work in an entire year). But it was just miserable. Seriously, I tell everyone to run from public service jobs, they aren't worth it. Maybe when you're older and value stability and a pension but not when you're young. 

I'm not there anymore, moved on to better things thank God. My brain was turning to mush in the public service.

But I still wonder where I'd be if I took that startup job.

But the government job had higher pay and probably set you up better for future opportunities than the cool company would have.
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