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Can't find the "Good Read" thread, so...
I definitely feel like I'm more Brontosaur, than T-Rex.

Here's a brief scientific critique of Teicholz's take on the Masai.
Scienceofnutrician.wordpress

In support of her argument that diets heavy in saturated fat won’t lead to high cholesterol because the Masai do it, she cites an article published in the NEJM titled “Some Unique Biologic Characteristics of the Masai of East Africa.”1 The entire point of that article was to claim that the reason that the Masai have such low cholesterol levels despite a diet heavy in saturated fats was because they have a unique feedback mechanism that suppresses endogenous cholesterol synthesis that most of us don’t have. Yet there of course is no mention of this in the text (or GCBC) because to suggest that their low cholesterol was due to genetics would hurt her meat-is-good-for-you narrative.
"To love life is to plant trees, under which shade you may never sit"
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“The Cadaver King” may have just jumped to number one on my have to read list (synopsis below). It comes out at the end of February so hopefully I can finish my current book before it is released. It sounds like a book you will finish in one sitting:

“After two three-year-old girls were raped and murdered in rural Mississippi, law enforcement pursued and convicted two innocent men: Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks. Together they spent a combined thirty years in prison before finally being exonerated in 2008. Meanwhile, the real killer remained free.

The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist recounts the story of how the criminal justice system allowed this to happen, and of how two men, Dr. Steven Hayne and Dr. Michael West, built successful careers on the back of that structure. For nearly two decades Hayne, a medical examiner, performed the vast majority of Mississippi's autopsies, while his friend Dr. West, a local dentist, pitched himself as a forensic jack-of-all-trades. Together they became the go-to experts for prosecutors and helped put countless Mississippians in prison. But then some of those convictions began to fall apart.”

Here, Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington tell the haunting story of how the courts and Mississippi's death investigation system-a relic of the Jim Crow era-failed to deliver justice for its citizens. The authors argue that bad forensics, structural racism, and institutional failures are at fault, and raise sobering questions about our ability and willingness to address them.
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83 you ever read Monkey Town? I loved it, pretty much covers the Scopes trial in Tennessee, great read on law and religion battling it out in the court system!
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(2018-02-23, 07:10 PM)bicboi Wrote: 83 you ever read Monkey Town? I loved it, pretty much covers the Scopes trial in Tennessee, great read on law and religion battling it out in the court system!

Never heard of it. 

I'll have to check it out!
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Charles Patterson's Eternal Treblinka is insanely good. Patterson is an absolute beast and anything he writes on regarding the Holocaust will keep your eyes glued to the pages. Might mess up your head a little though. 10/10 book though, would recommend to anyone interested in learning about how the Nazis went from concentration camps to kill camps.

I need to go read something colourful and light hearted (spiderman or something like that) after this lol
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(2018-02-13, 03:33 AM)Arsenal Wrote:
(2018-02-12, 11:41 PM)WTTM Wrote:
(2018-02-12, 11:32 PM)Arsenal Wrote:
(2018-02-12, 08:27 PM)WTTM Wrote:
(2018-02-12, 07:06 PM)Cornholio Wrote: I was all revved up after reading The China Study also, and then I read the critiques which took the wind out my sails.

That Gut book I just read has a thing on enterotypes which are specific to global regions apparently. I wonder if gut flora is factor in  the difference in cholesterol levels et al. between N.A and Asia, not just animal protein consumption?

Try Dr. Rhonda Patrick, she doesn’t have a book that I’m aware off but she was on Joe Rogan recently and she’s pretty bright gale. She has a lot of content on YouTube and I believe I’ve heard her talk about gut flora
At the very least, we're asking nutritional questions, and that's fantastic, especially for a guy like me, who basically shoved anything and everything in my mouth.  I started noticing that my body was starting to reject a few things, and i started whittling my dietary choices down.  In my 40's, I said bye to KFC and msg.  In my early 50's, bye bye cow milk and bye to binge eating and drinking...moderation was the key.  Mid 50's bye red meat.  I'm now vegetarian moving to vegan.

It simply feels right, and I feel it in my gut.  It feels like my 'flora' is happy.

I've got buddies who are entering their 50's and they're ignoring what their bodies are telling them.  They're all swollen, some carrying 50 extra pounds.  They're all heading for an emergency room episode within the decade.  I just lost a university classmate last month...owned a Greek restaurant downtown...heavy meat based culture.  56...dead.

Keep asking the questions guys, and listen to your bodies.

Dr. Patrick turned me onto Broccoli Sprouts, purchased the seeds online, mason jars and lids with screens to do my own sprouting. Taste great as well.

Here’s an excellent video on cholesterol from an Irish guy, worth a watch if you’re taking an interest in your health https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fuj6nxCDBZ0 it is long but really good
Do you think it's possible that some humans are predisposed to plant based eating and some to meat?

Asian populations are experiencing more cancer since adopting the western diet but that may be type of meat (fish vs red) and amount of meat (little vs lots) based rather than meat vs non meat.

But, from personal experience, I am absolutely certain that some food can affect people negatively and may fly under the radar. For me, it's milk. Not all dairy products - just milk. Up until about 3-4 years ago, I drank milk regularly. I've also had a couple of colds a year and yearly allergy bouts in spring and fall ever since my teen years.  I had to take asthma pumps during these allergies. Since stopping milk, all of it is gone. And I do mean all of it. Have not touched my pumps in that time, have not allergies and no colds. I had the actual flu once over that stretch and that's it. I now take flu shots since this year.

My wife and I cannot see anything else I've changed in my lifestyle that could account for this. We are well beyond any time frame that could be explained by a placebo effect.

I know some folks who tried it and saw no change. I know some folks who had to cut out all dairy to see the change.

What this has taught me is that not all humans react to food the same so books proclaiming a new food gospel are likely wrong for a lot of people. I think humans are fundamentally omnivores and I do believe that moderation is best for an average person. But my experience with milk tells me that you might as well experiment a bit as you might find that some foods don't agree with you, even if they don't cause you typical symptoms like stomach aches.
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It’s sugar that is the problem, for you and milk it’s lactose. Fruit used to be seasonal and had way more seeds in it, now we can consume it anytime, fructose needs to be processed in the liver and fatty liver is no longer just an alcohol disease. The extreme amounts of carbohydrates consumed cause a spike in insulin to deal with the glucose and causes insulin resistance and a path to type 2 diabetes.
Don’t blame the butter for what the bread did
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I've gone back to the Edward Rutherfurd well and picked up New York. Liking it so far; I'm just at the point where the American Revolutionary war is starting. Wonder how it turns out...
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Reading The Blood of Emmet Till, about the lynching of 14-year old Emmet Till because he was (as it turned out wrongly) accused of whistling at a white woman in Mississippi.

I’m about 100 pages in and it’s a pretty raw read. It’s pretty difficult at times.
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(2018-03-11, 04:04 PM)TheOilerFan83 Wrote: Reading The Blood of Emmet Till, about the lynching of 14-year old Emmet Till because he was (as it turned out wrongly) accused of whistling at a white woman in Mississippi.

I’m about 100 pages in and it’s a pretty raw read. It’s pretty difficult at times.

I haven’t read that book, but I can only imagine how brutal it is. That entire situation is beyond disgusting. ***** south.
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(2018-03-11, 04:04 PM)TheOilerFan83 Wrote: Reading The Blood of Emmet Till, about the lynching of 14-year old Emmet Till because he was (as it turned out wrongly) accused of whistling at a white woman in Mississippi.

I’m about 100 pages in and it’s a pretty raw read. It’s pretty difficult at times.

this was just recommended to me but I read enough on it. Its such a graphic story and the image of him out of the river is gut wrenching. Wayyyy too grisly for me to read at the moment, let us know what you think
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Just finished No Surrender: My Thirty-year War  Hiroo Onoda.

Guy spent 30 years in the jungle eating bananas and finally surrendered to Marcos in 1974. More a tale of obstinate dismissal of facts than survival.
Would have liked to read more of his life after he surrendered. Apparently couldn't handle how changed Japan had become in the interim, and moved to the jungles of Brazil shortly after his return. (His brother had a farm there.)

Died just a few years ago at 91(?)
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(2018-03-11, 11:22 PM)bicboi Wrote:
(2018-03-11, 04:04 PM)TheOilerFan83 Wrote: Reading The Blood of Emmet Till, about the lynching of 14-year old Emmet Till because he was (as it turned out wrongly) accused of whistling at a white woman in Mississippi.

I’m about 100 pages in and it’s a pretty raw read. It’s pretty difficult at times.

this was just recommended to me but I read enough on it. Its such a graphic story and the image of him out of the river is gut wrenching. Wayyyy too grisly for me to read at the moment, let us know what you think

I really liked it (I gave it 4 out of 5 stars at the end). It discusses the murder, the division between the north and south, how it inspired many to advocate for change (Rosa Parks said it was the thought of Till's lynching that inspired her to not sit in the back of the bus), the court case, the verdict, and how little has really changed.
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Finishing up Rosi Braidotti's The Posthuman, great book on perspectives about the disconnectedness of people in the 21st century
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I got back into reading after exams/taking some ‘me time’.

I am currently reading Weapons of Math Destruction. It discusses the negative impact quantitative models have on society. Very interesting read.

I picked up a library card to cut down on my books expense. I signed up with Edmonton Public Library and have been checking out ebooks. The selection is limited but they have about 15-20 books on my list that I have seen so far.
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Ha anyone here read the Jurassic park books? How are they?
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^
They are good for Crichtons. The first is better than the second.
I haven't read the third, but according to wiki, it looks to be a mashing of the first two.
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(2018-05-17, 10:59 AM)Cornholio Wrote: ^
They are good for Crichtons. The first is better than the second.
I haven't read the third, but according to wiki, it looks to be a mashing of the first two.

So it's worth the read? I read almost no fiction so I have no clue who or what is considered good. 

In the last 5 years, the only fiction books I have read are Fight Club and 1/3 of the first Game of Thrones book.
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You're putting way too much thought into this. lol
In fact, you could have actually read the first two in the time you first posted. They are very light reading. Crichton books are generally conceptually interesting (from a science or engineering standpoint), but with poor writing (especially the earlier ones).

So yeah, worth the read given the limited investment.
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I have been reading 'The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist'.

If anyone wants to read a book that makes you give up on the integrity of the justice system (particularly in Mississippi), this is the one!

It tells a story about the complacency of the coroner's office in ensuring the preservation of the racial segregation in the US and their co-opertion with the sheriff's office and prosecution. It focuses on two hack medical 'experts' who mastered the art of fraudulent scientific study and deceptive testimony to maintain this social hierarchy.
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