Thread Rating:
  • 2 Vote(s) - 3.5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Can't find the "Good Read" thread, so...
I bought "Baseball's Back In Town" (a comprehensive history of baseball in Toronto) a couple weeks ago and it's amazing. So many interesting facts and old photos.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13640...ck-in-town
Reply
Thanks given by:
I'm reading Stephen King's 'The Dark Tower' series and I'm finally on the 7th and final book. I've enjoyed it, but the series peaks at number 4 and then takes a bit of a dip.

Overall, it's something I'd highly recommend for anyone looking for a new book series to get into.
 'The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'
Reply
Thanks given by:
I read I think 1.5 books of the Dark Tower series. Sort of lost interest. The movie is coming out this summer I think, but no trailer yet, and I heard they're reshooting parts of it. Not a good sign. Granted, I am pretty excited to see Idris Elba and Matthew McConnaghy, pretty good cast.
Reply
Thanks given by:
It's a very difficult series to get into, probably because for the entirety of the first book you have no idea what's going on. You basically just get introduced to this character, but you know nothing of his story or the world he is in (or even when), aside from the fact that he is in search of a dark tower. Slowly you learn more and more about the character and the world he lives in, but the first book is very slow moving. Thankfully, the first book is only 200 or 300 pages, so it's a pretty quick read, but if it wasn't for the fact that I had the first 4 books given to me as a gift, I likely would have stopped after the first one. Having just started the 7th book, I can only say that it's enjoyable so far, but I would rank 1-6 as follows: 4, 3, 2, 5, 1, 6.

The movie adaption I believe tells a different story of the one in the novels (at least that's what I've read). I think I read an article that says it's more of a sequel, which I'm a little skeptical of. Regardless, I don't have high expectations. I do enjoy Idris Elba though.
 'The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'
Reply
Thanks given by:
Just finished CJ Pascoe's Dude, you're a *****". It's an ethnography on how traditional masculinity and sexuality is toxic towards males, females, and institutions. I thought the art of ethnography was dead, but this was well done. The methodology was really well done and I don't have much complaints​. 8/10
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:
Read 'City of Thorns: Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp' on the flight yesterday. I could not stop reading. Read it front to back in one sitting.

It tells the story of 9 refugees in Dadaab. How the got there and their attempts to get out. It also brings light to the kenyan-Somalian issues rife in the area (a topic I am admittedly not that well-versed in), and discusses the struggle between the UN, local governments, and al shabaab.

It was on of the books of the year by the fininacial times in 2015(?) and deservedly so. I strongly recommend it.
Reply
Thanks given by:
Finished The Shining and noticed some pretty big differences between it and the movie. Might be worth it to read the novel if you're looking for a ghost story.

Reading the sequel Doctor Sleep now
 'The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'
Reply
Thanks given by:
Guilty as Sin, Edward Klein

I won't say it was a good read... but it was a quick read. It gives a good insight on Comey's preoccupation with Hillary.
It was published just a few weeks before the election, so the re-opening of the e-mail/server investigation is not included.
Reply
Thanks given by:
Read Bernard Berkhoffers White Man's Indian, absolute trash.
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:
Read A History of Transsexuality by Joanne Meyerowitz. The book was great but a few sub headings in her chapters would've made for better organization. It was quite fragmented and if I wasn't doing a paper on it i wouldn't have understood the content as well. Some of the terms were hard to read because I'm used to 21st century language regarding trans identifying people but I feel Meyerowitz did that on purpose to show the transition of language itself concerning respecting trans people
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:
Knocked a couple books off my list the last month: 

Read 'Killing a King: The Assassination and Yitzhak Rabin and the Remaking of Israel'.
Overall a good read. Does a fairly good job of showing the divide between the left and right in Israel, particularly for someone like me who I would classify as having beginner level knowledge of the history and issues surrounding Israel and the region. Solid 3.5/5

From Google Books: 
The assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin remains the single most consequential event in Israel's recent history, and one that fundamentally altered the trajectory for both Israel and the Palestinians. Killing a King relates the parallel stories of Rabin and his stalker, Yigal Amir, over the two years leading up to the assassination, as one of them planned political deals he hoped would lead to peace, and the other plotted murder.
Dan Ephron, who reported from the Middle East for much of the past two decades, covered both the rally where Rabin was killed and the subsequent murder trial. He describes how Rabin, a former general who led the army in the Six-Day War of 1967, embraced his nemesis, Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat, and set about trying to resolve the twentieth century's most vexing conflict. He recounts in agonizing detail how extremists on both sides undermined the peace process with ghastly violence. And he reconstructs the relentless scheming of Amir, a twenty-five-year-old law student and Jewish extremist who believed that Rabin's peace effort amounted to a betrayal of Israel and the Jewish people. As Amir stalked Rabin over many months, the agency charged with safeguarding the Israeli leader missed key clues, overlooked intelligence reports, and then failed to protect him at the critical moment, exactly twenty years ago. It was the biggest security blunder in the agency's history.
Through the prism of the assassination, much about Israel today comes into focus, from the paralysis in peacemaking to the fraught relationship between current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Barack Obama. Based on Israeli police reports, interviews, confessions, and the cooperation of both Rabin's and Amir's families, Killing a King is a tightly coiled narrative that reaches an inevitable, shattering conclusion. One can't help but wonder what Israel would look like today had Rabin lived.


Also read 'The Case for Impeachment. I really enjoyed this book. It wasn't a biased presentation of Trump. It was an analytical approach. It compares Trump's behaviour to past presidents who have faced impeachment, Johnson, Nixon, and Clinton. It also does what I felt was a pretty good job of discussing the law around impeachment in a way that took into account the intent of the law is it was written. It's a quick weekend read. 3.5/5

From Google books: 
“Lichtman has written what may be the most important book of the year.”  —The Hill
"It is still striking to see the full argument unfold and realize that you don’t have to be a zealot to imagine some version of it happening…Lies. Abuse of power. Treason. Crimes against humanity. Martial law. Lichtman throws everything Trump’s way.." —Washington Post 
Professor Allan J. Lichtman, who has correctly forecasted thirty years of presidential outcomes, makes the case for impeaching the 45th president of the United States, Donald J. Trump 
In the fall of 2016, Distinguished Professor of History at American University Allan J. Lichtman made headlines when he predicted that Donald J. Trump would defeat the heavily favored Democrat, Hillary Clinton, to win the presidential election. 
Now, in clear, nonpartisan terms, Lichtman lays out the reasons Congress could remove Trump from the Oval Office: his ties to Russia before and after the election, the complicated financial conflicts of interest at home and abroad, and his abuse of executive authority. 
The Case for Impeachment also offers a fascinating look at presidential impeachments throughout American history, including the often-overlooked story of Andrew Johnson’s impeachment, details about Richard Nixon’s resignation, and Bill Clinton’s hearings. Lichtman shows how Trump exhibits many of the flaws (and more) that have doomed past presidents. As the Nixon Administration dismissed the reporting of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein as “character assassination” and “a vicious abuse of the journalistic process,” Trump has attacked the “dishonest media,” claiming, “the press should be ashamed of themselves.” 
Historians, legal scholars, and politicians alike agree: we are in politically uncharted waters—the durability of our institutions is being undermined and the public’s confidence in them is eroding, threatening American democracy itself. 
Most citizens—politics aside—want to know where the country is headed. Lichtman argues, with clarity and power, that for Donald Trump’s presidency, smoke has become fire.

I am currently reading 'Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of Bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State' by Ali Suofan. I bought this book specifically because Soufan's first book 'The Black Banners: Inside the Hunt for Al Qaieda' is one of my favourite books. 

Soufan is a former FBI agent and was at one time considered a rising star and director of the FBI in the making. Much of his information is first and accounts from interviews with al Qaeda members. He was at one time the FBI's go-to man for anything Bin Laden so he knows his shit.

From Google books: 
In early 2011, the heart of the Muslim world roiled in protest, consumed with the upheaval of the Arab Spring. The governments of Tunisia and Egypt had already fallen; those of Libya and Yemen would soon follow. Watching the chaos from his hideout in Pakistan, Osama bin Laden saw a historic opportunity: "the next stage," he declared, "will be the reinstating of the rule of the caliphate."
Within weeks, bin Laden was dead, shot in the dark by a U.S. Navy SEAL. Commentators around the world began to prophesy al-Qaeda's imminent demise. But six years later, the reality is the reverse. The group's affiliates have swollen, and the Islamic State--al-Qaeda's most brutal spinoff to date--proclaims itself the reborn caliphate bin Laden foretold in his final weeks.
In Anatomy of Terror, former FBI special agent and New York Times best-selling author Ali Soufan dissects bin Laden's brand of jihadi terrorism and its major offshoots, revealing how these organizations were formed, how they operate, their strengths, and--crucially--their weaknesses. This riveting account examines the new Islamic radicalism through the eyes of its flag-bearers, including a Jordanian former drug dealer whose cruelties shocked even his fellow militants, an Air Force colonel who once served Saddam Hussein, and a provincial bookworm who declared himself caliph of all Muslims. We meet Ayman al-Zawahiri, titular head of al-Qaeda; Saif al-Adel, an Egyptian ex-soldier who faked his own death to become the group's security chief; and bin Laden's own beloved son Hamza, a prime candidate to lead the organization his late father founded.
To eliminate the scourge of terrorism, we must first know who the enemy actually is, and what his motivations are. Anatomy of Terror lays bare the psychology and inner workings of al-Qaeda, the Islamic State, and their spawn, and shows how the spread of terror can be stopped.
Reply
Thanks given by:
You might be interested in this one, TOF
After the Reich: The Brutal History Of the Allied Occupation

I'm grinding my way through this at the moment. There's a lot of stuff in there that I was not aware of.
https://www.amazon.ca/After-Reich-Brutal...0465003389
Reply
Thanks given by:
Sounds interesting. I'll have to check it out.

The podcast I listen recently mentioned a book from 2011 called 'The Russian Origins for the First World War'. Here is a quick synopsis:
'In a major reinterpretation, Sean McMeekin rejects the standard notion of the war’s beginning as either a Germano-Austrian pre-emptive strike or a miscalculation. The key to the outbreak of violence, he argues, lies in St. Petersburg. Russian statesmen unleashed the war through policy decisions based on imperial ambitions in the Near East.'

I thought that might interest you.
Reply
Thanks given by: Cornholio
I'll give it a shot.
Russia was the first country to mobilize, so maybe the theory holds water.
Reply
Thanks given by:
(2017-03-20, 04:15 PM)encore Wrote: I'm reading Stephen King's 'The Dark Tower' series and I'm finally on the 7th and final book. I've enjoyed it, but the series peaks at number 4 and then takes a bit of a dip.

Overall, it's something I'd highly recommend for anyone looking for a new book series to get into.

I see the first book of that series always being put at the front at Chapters locations now. Likely being heavily promoted in anticipation for the film. I'm thinking about getting into it. The Stand and The Shining are the only other Stephen King books I've read.

Edit: Currently reading "Ford Country" by John Grisham. I heard about the author through this Royce Da 5'9" rap line:

"Y'all ****** should call Nickel the Don Bishop
The Poet, a mixture of Don Go and some John Grisham"
Reply
Thanks given by:
Finished Anatomy of Terror. It was good. Black Banners is a way better book by Soufan, though.

Read On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Tmothy Snyder. Quick read. Took less than an hour.

I am starting The Last Days of Hitler by Hugh Trevor-Roper today.

Corn: I'll have to pick up the book you suggested next time I am in Canada. I can't get it on e-book *rolls eyes*
Reply
Thanks given by:
Anyone read Darktown by Thomas Mullen? Almost bought it the other day at Chapters, but decided against it since I have a long backlog of books I plan to read. The premise seemed interesting and it's been getting high praise.
 'The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)