Thread Rating:
  • 2 Vote(s) - 3.5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Can't find the "Good Read" thread, so...
Fantasy adventure is probably the perfect description for The Dark Tower. It's basically just your classic "good guy vs evil guy, with conflicting goals" story. The first book of the series was probably either my least or 2nd least book because I found it extremely confusing. Instead of having the reader start at the beginning of the story, you basically just get plopped right face down in the middle of it, with new worlds, characters, and a slightly off-English language, so I personally found it a little overwhelming. It is very similar to Lord of the Rings, in that it features a fellowship of sorts as they try to make their way to this Dark Tower, which is basically on the other side of the world. The series follows the journey, as they come across different towns, creatures, and challenges along the way. It deals a lot with going back and forth between the Earth as we know it and this world where the Dark Tower exists, so the language of the book goes back and forth, which might be a little difficult to follow. If you do decide to get into it, I'd suggest at least reading the first two books. Like I said, I wasn't a huge fan of the first book, but by the second book things started to piece together and the series started getting very cool.

Give it a try, bic. If you're into fantasy I think you might like this one.
 'The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'
Reply
Thanks given by: TheNumber13
I remember you saying that about the first book- that it won't hook you right away. Luckily it's not too long. Stephen King refers to the series as his 'Magnum Opus'.
Reply
Thanks given by:
From memory, it's almost like a different authors wrote the first and fourth in the series. Different style, much less word padding.
I liked the first, not so much the second and third. The fourth was the best of those which I've read.
Reply
Thanks given by:
I just started game of thrones. (the book)
Never seen the show...
Reply
Thanks given by:
I wouldn't recommend anything past the 3rd book mate. It gets convoluted and hard to follow. My favorite is the first book
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:
Read Foucault's Discipline and Punish: The Birth of Prison.

Michel Foucault is the most overrated and over analyzed academic in the history of academia, but this is one book I'd suggest as its accessible to the average reader
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by: poppabyrd
Read ‘Churchill & Orwell’, ‘In the Garden of the Beast’, and ‘The Power of Habit’ over the last month.

Power of Habit is an incredible book for anyone interesting in self improvement/business. Overall, the author is a great story teller, incorporating stories of personal success (a man who has no short term memory a la 50 first dates who is able to build new habits), sports (tony Dungy and how he built a winner in Indianapolis), and society (how Rosa Parks sparked change despite being one of a number of blacks arrested for sitting in the wrong spot).

Currently am giving the first game of thrones book a shot, as well as reading ‘Killers if the Flower Moon’, about the Osage murders and the FBI. Since school has started, I don’t have much time for personal reading but I hope to polish off a book every 2-3 weeks.
Reply
Thanks given by:
(2017-10-17, 03:25 PM)TheOilerFan83 Wrote: Currently am giving the first game of thrones book a shot, as well as reading ‘Killers if the Flower Moon’, about the Osage murders and the FBI. Since school has started, I don’t have much time for personal reading but I hope to polish off a book every 2-3 weeks.

Excited for you to start the GoT books, they have their definite flaws but aren't as bad as some (including myself) make them out to be.

I'm a ibt cranky that I don't have time to read for fun but at least my course books are a bit fun. Reading Mary Douglas' Natural Symbols for a project and its refreshing.
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:
(2016-05-17, 12:19 AM)bicboi Wrote: does anyone have any suggestions for some good coming of age books? Preferably male protagonist who's entering adulthood?

I found a few at a book store, but the main characters were females and in different countries during different time periods and am looking for something more familiar

The Ender books by Orson Scott Card.
Courage, my word, it didn't come, it doesn't matter.
Reply
Thanks given by:
Just picked up Dan Brown's new book. Stay tuned...(shouldn't be long)
Reply
Thanks given by:
Finished Flowers of the Killer Moon. It was a incredible read. If anyone is interested in learning about a forgotten tragedy in 20th Century Native American history, I would urge reading this book. It talks about the murders and the work of the FBI agent sent by Hoover to solve the murders, at time before the FBI had the power of a police force: no ability to arrest, no right to carry guns (officially). The corruption, collusion, degradation is indescribable.

Here is a description of the Osage Murders courtesy Wiki:

The Osage Indian murders were a series of murders of Osage people in Osage County, Oklahoma in the early 1920s; newspapers described the increasing number of unsolved murders as the "Reign of Terror". Estimates are that 60 or more wealthy, full-blood Osage native Americans were killed from 1921 to 1925. The murders appear to have been committed by people intent on taking over the great wealth of the Osage, whose land was producing valuable oil, and who each had headrights that earned lucrative annual royalties. Investigation by law enforcement, including the predecessor to the FBI, also revealed extensive corruption among local officials involved in the Osage guardian program. Most of the murders were never prosecuted, but some men were convicted and sentenced.

It read like a fiction thriller. Great writing.

It's gets the TOF 5 star rating.

Am now reading "Fractured Lands", which discusses the beginning of the Arab Spring from the point of view of six civilians who were caught in the middle of it.
Reply
Thanks given by:
Finished Fractured Lands. Decent and quick read. Moral of the story: the ME is too ***** up.

I’m not sure what I am gonna read next. I am not sure what genre I’m feeling.
Reply
Thanks given by:
(2016-01-17, 09:08 PM)cflisthebest Wrote: Uncle Johns 2nd bathroom reader.

Ha my husband has read all of those..he is one of those trivia freaks.
weedwacking/flamethrowing grandma smurf
Reply
Thanks given by:
Just finished John Grisham's "The Whistler".
Reply
Thanks given by:
Read Crichton's last novel, Dragon Teeth. Not sure if he wanted this one published as is, but his wife found the manuscript after his death, and voila...
The Cope-Marsh Bone Wars as seen through eyes of a fictional character. Interesting in that it is a period piece on the Indian wars at that time (Custer-Little Bighorn).
I'd say the manuscript had another two or three re-writes ahead of it before Crichton would have made it available for publishing.
Reply
Thanks given by:
(2017-10-18, 08:11 AM)Limestoner Wrote: Just picked up Dan Brown's new book. Stay tuned...(shouldn't be long)

I didn't like it. I think that his usual storyline has run its course.
The MB Trifecta: Low Cost, Low Risk, No Return
Reply
Thanks given by:
Finished When Biometrics Fail by Shoshana Magnet, this book was awesome. She explained why biometric technology simply isn't feasible (cost benefit analysis, false positives, reinforcing racist stereotypes,etc...) but wasted a whole chapter on media representations on anxieties fueled by these technologies, mainly used Minority Report.

Solid read though, 8/10
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)