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Confirmed: Surge in job growth drives unemployment rate down to new 40-year low of 5.6 per cent
#1
Surge in job growth drives unemployment rate down to new 40-year low of 5.6 per cent



OTTAWA—A blast of 94,100 new jobs last month has knocked the country’s unemployment rate down to 5.6 per cent — its lowest level since Statistics Canada started measuring comparable data more than 40 years ago.

The overall number marked the labour force survey’s largest monthly increase since March 2012 when there was a gain of 94,000 jobs, Statistics Canada said Friday.


The November employment surge was fuelled by the addition of 89,900 full-time positions. For employee work, the private sector added 78,600 positions in November, while the public sector gained 8,300 jobs.

Last month’s increase pushed the jobless rate down from October’s reading of 5.8 per cent, which had been the previous low mark since comparable data first became available in 1976. The old statistical approach — prior to 1976 — registered an unemployment rate reading of 5.4 per cent in 1974.

But Friday’s report also contained disappointing details.

Year-over-year average hourly wage growth for permanent employees continued its decline in November to 1.46 per cent — to deliver its weakest reading since July 2017.

Experts have been expecting wage growth to rise thanks to the tightened labour market, but it has dropped every month since its May peak of 3.9 per cent. It now sits well below inflation.

The Bank of Canada keeps a close watch on wages ahead of its interest-rate decisions. On Wednesday, the central bank held its benchmark rate at 1.75 per cent, but in explaining its decision it highlighted other economic negatives such as weaker-than-expected business investment and the sharp drop in oil prices.

Royce Mendes of CIBC Economics said the Bank of Canada will take notice of the “massive reading” in the November jobs report as it mulls next month’s rate decision.

“The large gain in jobs will keep a January rate hike on the table for now, but we’ll need to see similarly positive evidence from other indicators and no major reversal in the next jobs report,” Mendes wrote in a research note to clients Friday.

Statistics Canada’s report Friday also said that, compared to 12 months earlier, employment was up 1.2 per cent following a net increase of 218,800 jobs. The addition of 227,400 full-time positions offset a small decrease in part-time work.

The November jobs report showed the goods-producing sector added 26,900 jobs following a notable gain of 14,800 construction positions. The services sector generated 67,200 jobs last month with help from the addition of 26,000 positions in professional, scientific and technical services.

By region, employment rose in six provinces and was led by gains in Quebec and Alberta.


https://www.thestar.com/business/2018/12...-cent.html
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#2
Sounds just like the US

I am sure all the conservatives will loudly proclaim what a great job Trudeau is doing, all the while neglecting the poor performance of wages.
" I don't drink these days. I am allergic to alcohol and narcotics. I break out in handcuffs "
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#3
I don't know, the US has wages. The best wages. Nobody has better wages. Trust me.
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#4
Yes but 

Someone built far too much office space in downtown Calgary under the assumption that oil prices would hold steady at $110 USD/barrel
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#5
sex jobs don't count.....
cfl
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#6
So how does this break down exactly? In Ottawa alone the past few years I've personally witnessed the closure of many many big stores here that combined probably had ten's of thousands of employees (Sears, Mexx, BBB, Guess, Futureshop, Bestbuy, Target etc. among others) who obviously lost their jobs after these places shut down, but from what I've seen there hasn't been anything opening up to replace them and replace all those jobs, right?
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#7
The breakdown is in the article lol. Retail is a horrible metric to use for employment rates. It’s shedding jobs and commercial space even in booming economies simply due to a shift in business models.
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#8
(2018-12-07, 12:47 PM)cflisthebest Wrote: sex jobs don't count.....

Your industry just never gets any credit.
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#9
(2018-12-07, 04:06 PM)Heisenberg Wrote: The breakdown is in the article lol. Retail is a horrible metric to use for employment rates.  It’s shedding jobs and commercial space even in booming economies simply due to a shift in business models.

Lol I got excited 3/4 the way down and stopped reading.
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