Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Feeling a bit Guilty
#21
How long have you been employed there?
If it's longer than 5 years, I'd give more than 2 weeks notice.
They can't fire you for giving notice, at least not without severance pay, which would help bridge the month between your eventual date anyway. I think you're safe to give more notice, you never know who you will meet again.

This isn't exactly related, but when I was 16 i worked summers at an ice cream place. I had gotten into a fight with my manager about something, and then turned around and took that anger out on a customer. They filed a complaint etc etc.

Fast forward 20 years and that same person works with me now. And they remember me and what I did.

You literally never know.
O' for a good life, we just might have to weaken
Reply
Thanks given by: Nanuuk
#22
I agree, give them more notice, worst case they say no thanks, and walk you out and still owe you the 2 weeks notice pay (or more, not exactly sure on the labour laws), best case they ask you to help them find someone new and you can leave on a really good note.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#23
Calculating severance pay
Example: A regular work week

Susan regularly works 40 hours a week and is paid $15.00 an hour. Her employer has a payroll of more than $2.5 million. Her employer gives Susan seven weeks' notice of termination, and Susan works for the notice period. At the end of the notice period, Susan's employment is severed. On that date, Susan has been employed for seven years, nine months and two weeks.

Here's how to calculate Susan's severance pay entitlement.

Calculate Susan's regular wages for a regular work week.
Susan usually works 40 hours a week × $15.00 = $600.00
Number of Susan's completed years = 7
Divide the number of complete months Susan was employed in the incomplete year by 12.
Susan worked 9 complete months ÷ 12 = 0.75
Add the number arrived at in Step 2 (7) to the number arrived at in Step 3 (0.75),
7 + 0.75 = 7.75
Multiply Susan's regular wages for a regular work week ($600.00) by the number arrived at in Step 4 (7.75).
$600.00 × 7.75 = $4,650.00.

Result: Susan is entitled to $4,650.00 in severance pay.

A special method of calculating severance pay is used for employees who are paid on a basis other than time worked.
O' for a good life, we just might have to weaken
Reply
Thanks given by:
#24
(2018-09-14, 02:48 PM)Chip Wrote: Calculating severance pay
Example: A regular work week

Susan regularly works 40 hours a week and is paid $15.00 an hour. Her employer has a payroll of more than $2.5 million. Her employer gives Susan seven weeks' notice of termination, and Susan works for the notice period. At the end of the notice period, Susan's employment is severed. On that date, Susan has been employed for seven years, nine months and two weeks.

Here's how to calculate Susan's severance pay entitlement.

   Calculate Susan's regular wages for a regular work week.
   Susan usually works 40 hours a week × $15.00 = $600.00
   Number of Susan's completed years = 7
   Divide the number of complete months Susan was employed in the incomplete year by 12.
   Susan worked 9 complete months ÷ 12 = 0.75
   Add the number arrived at in Step 2 (7) to the number arrived at in Step 3 (0.75),
   7 + 0.75 = 7.75
   Multiply Susan's regular wages for a regular work week ($600.00) by the number arrived at in Step 4 (7.75).
   $600.00 × 7.75 = $4,650.00.

Result: Susan is entitled to $4,650.00 in severance pay.

A special method of calculating severance pay is used for employees who are paid on a basis other than time worked.

I don't think this is relevant....he is quitting. (but good info, nonetheless)
Reply
Thanks given by:
#25
The employer cannot dismiss the non-unionized employee if said employee gives notice that they are leaving. That would still constitute dismissal without cause and the employee would have to receive severance.

I am not so sure about Chip's information, although it could vary from province to province. I am pretty sure that if an employer gives reasonable notice to an employee that their services are no longer required that notice releases the requirement for severance beyond the legislated two weeks of pay. I guess in Chip's example seven weeks is not considered to be reasonable.

As far as your quandary goes I agree that if you have been with your employer for sometime and they've treated you right then it would be (some would say a moral obligation) very reasonable to give them notice now.
“Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.”
-Eleanor Roosevelt
Reply
Thanks given by:
#26
(2018-09-14, 02:52 PM)northern1 Wrote:
(2018-09-14, 02:48 PM)Chip Wrote: Calculating severance pay
Example: A regular work week

Susan regularly works 40 hours a week and is paid $15.00 an hour. Her employer has a payroll of more than $2.5 million. Her employer gives Susan seven weeks' notice of termination, and Susan works for the notice period. At the end of the notice period, Susan's employment is severed. On that date, Susan has been employed for seven years, nine months and two weeks.

Here's how to calculate Susan's severance pay entitlement.

   Calculate Susan's regular wages for a regular work week.
   Susan usually works 40 hours a week × $15.00 = $600.00
   Number of Susan's completed years = 7
   Divide the number of complete months Susan was employed in the incomplete year by 12.
   Susan worked 9 complete months ÷ 12 = 0.75
   Add the number arrived at in Step 2 (7) to the number arrived at in Step 3 (0.75),
   7 + 0.75 = 7.75
   Multiply Susan's regular wages for a regular work week ($600.00) by the number arrived at in Step 4 (7.75).
   $600.00 × 7.75 = $4,650.00.

Result: Susan is entitled to $4,650.00 in severance pay.

A special method of calculating severance pay is used for employees who are paid on a basis other than time worked.

I don't think this is relevant....he is quitting. (but good info, nonetheless)

I posted it because he was afraid if he gave too much notice they would just fire him, and he needed the job for the month presumable to curb moving costs. By knowing your severance pay ahead of time, you wont be as afraid to get fired, depending on his pay and job history, he might be getting the same amount or even more if they fire him.

anyway good luck and have fun in PEI, I love it out there and if I could move there I would.
O' for a good life, we just might have to weaken
Reply
Thanks given by: MisterZ
#27
Pretty sure you only get severance pay only if you are laid-off, not if you get fired. Unless it was a part of their contract...
Reply
Thanks given by:
#28
(2018-09-14, 01:29 PM)Bong13 Wrote:
(2018-09-14, 12:49 PM)theDC Wrote: This is the job you took knowing you were leaving right? I seem to remember a thread where you were concerned about even taking the gig knowing you'd be leaving.

no you must be confused, I had planned to keep this job long term had we not decided to move.

Ah, fair. Someone else was concerned about the optics of taking a gig knowing they'd leave it soon.

I still think giving notice ahead of time is best. No reason not to, and almost any employer will appreciate it. And hey, who knows, maybe they come over the top with an amazing offer that you had never considered? (there's my wishful thinking coming through.)
Reply
Thanks given by:
#29
(2018-09-14, 03:19 PM)Fritz Wrote: Pretty sure you only get severance pay only if you are laid-off, not if you get fired.  Unless it was a part of their contract...

You can be fired legally with due process without severance.
But if you are fired for no reason, you have to give severance.

So I guess the argument is what's the difference between being laid off and being fired?
O' for a good life, we just might have to weaken
Reply
Thanks given by: MisterZ
#30
You know better than us how your company operates. if you think your boss will let you run your course there, then I would tell him. Having been on the employers side, having time to adjust is a blessing.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#31
(2018-09-14, 12:04 PM)theDC Wrote: Not denying that, I know they'd replace him quickly. But there's no reason to hide this. His concern is about burning bridges, my point is that letting them know actually helps them, thereby avoiding any burned bridges.

I may be reading between the lines, but I also believe his concern has to do with not being kept on til October 26th.
"I drink to make other people interesting"
~ E. Hemmingway
Reply
Thanks given by: Bong13
#32
(2018-09-14, 04:52 PM)Limestoner Wrote:
(2018-09-14, 12:04 PM)theDC Wrote: Not denying that, I know they'd replace him quickly. But there's no reason to hide this. His concern is about burning bridges, my point is that letting them know actually helps them, thereby avoiding any burned bridges.

I may be reading between the lines, but I also believe his concern has to do with not being kept on til October 26th.

You may be right, but based on how he described his relationship (positive), I doubt very much they'd have an issue with that. But, then again, O&G industry, so who knows?
Reply
Thanks given by:
#33
(2018-09-14, 03:11 PM)Nanuuk Wrote: I am not so sure about Chip's information, although it could vary from province to province. I am pretty sure that if an employer gives reasonable notice to an employee that their services are no longer required that notice releases the requirement for severance beyond the legislated two weeks of pay. I guess in Chip's example seven weeks is not considered to be reasonable.

Chip pulled his example straight from the Ontario Employment Standards website.

Here's the conditions to qualify for severance under the Act:

Qualifying for severance pay

An employee qualifies for severance pay if their employment is severed and they:

have worked for the employer for five or more years (including all the time spent by the employee in employment with the employer, whether continuous or not and whether active or not)
and
their employer:
has a payroll in Ontario of at least $2.5 million;
or
severed the employment of 50 or more employees in a six-month period because all or part of the business permanently closed.
"I drink to make other people interesting"
~ E. Hemmingway
Reply
Thanks given by:
#34
Thanks for the help guys, I will give it the weekend and see how I feel about telling them on Monday.


I have been with the company 3 years this October, I have a good relationship with my boss, we have known each other since High School.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#35
As Bic says, leave with a clear conscience, Bong Happy

I'd give 4 weeks notice, because you'll probably have to train someone before leaving, and they'd appreciate it if you do. When I did that in the past, the ex-employer really appreciated it.

This is probably not comparable to the larger notice you'd get if you were to get laid off...but at least, it's more than 2 weeks.
Not sure how much severance pay is in Alberta, but in socialist Quebec, you get a huge severance pay.
Why is common sense not so common?
Reply
Thanks given by:
#36
no training will be involved, they will hire somebody who can step into the role pretty easy.

Oilfield sales is more of a who you know industry then a what you know industry, they wont have a problem filling the role with somebody who has been around for a while.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#37
I believe you get 1 week pay for every year worked up to 8 years.

so even 10 years work they only have to pay you for 8 weeks
Reply
Thanks given by:
#38
follow what your contract says.

my industry you have to give 30 days.

i find if you say to early, it justs drags on your last time at work. we are far easier to replace then we think, life goes on.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#39
(2018-09-14, 04:33 PM)Chip Wrote:
(2018-09-14, 03:19 PM)Fritz Wrote: Pretty sure you only get severance pay only if you are laid-off, not if you get fired.  Unless it was a part of their contract...

You can be fired legally with due process without severance.
But if you are fired for no reason, you have to give severance.

So I guess the argument is what's the difference between being laid off and being fired?

cause
Reply
Thanks given by:
#40
just cause. Wink
"I drink to make other people interesting"
~ E. Hemmingway
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)