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Like it or not, MLB to implement pitch clock in 2018
#1
https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ml...470553001/


Thoughts?

Games this year took longer to play then any other season- 3 hours 5 mins

average age of MLB fan - 53 years old

Baseball Enrolment numbers down 41% over last 13 years
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#2
I think it's a good idea especially when there's no runners on to implement the 20-second pitch clock.

When there are runners on, pitchers may be thinking about pickoff attempts while on the mound so the 20-second runoff might not be applicable in those type of situations.
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#3
Studies have been done that say fatigue (ie. less recovery time between pitches) directly increases the risk of injury on elbow ligaments. Either MLB doesn't know about this (highly unlikely), have looked at contradicting studies (I don't know of any) or that they think the risk is worth the reward (my guess). Personally, I think it's an asinine idea.

"Dr. Jeremy Bruce, and Dr. James Andrews wrote a review article on Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries (Figure 1), and one of their primary findings centered around the role of muscle fatigue on UCL ruptures. The findings boil down to this: when you throw a baseball as hard as you can, the stress on the elbow is theoretically more than enough to tear your UCL. What protects the UCL, is the activation of the muscles of the flexor pronator mass. If those muscles become fatigued, they will not be able to exert as much force, and as a result, the UCL becomes at risk of rupture."

http://www.mikesonne.ca/baseball/why-pit...the-devil/
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#4
I find its the batters that slow things down a lot, do you really need to adjust your batting gloves after every pitch? If its a superstition thing then I suggest you change it and so does your 235 batting average.
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#5
(2017-12-06, 09:42 PM)Bong13 Wrote: I find its the batters that slow things down a lot, do you really need to adjust your batting gloves after every pitch? If its a superstition thing then I suggest you change it and so does your 235 batting average.

Valid.

Attend a minor league game and note the difference between guys who have played in the bigs and the rest of them.  The rest stay in the box.  The guys with big league experience are stepping out every pitch and adjust gloves, etc.

Definitely far more than when I was younger.
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#6
Fangraphs actually tracks a pitchers pace. That is how long, on average, a pitcher takes between pitches. In 2017 the average time between pitches league wide was 24.2 seconds.

There were 721,249 pitches thrown last year. Lets assume that 60% of them were thrown with no one on base and would therefore be subject to the pitch clock. That is 432,749 pitches. At 4.2 seconds saved per pitch that is 18,174,547 seconds or 30,292 minutes. Divide that by the total number of games played (4860) and you have an average savings of ~6 minutes per game.


Now I'm sure I missed something there because I have been up for way too long but the point is that for a relatively major change it does not seem to accomplish much. Would anyone here even notice if a game was 6 or even 15 minutes shorter?
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#7
6 minutes is imperceptable in a 3 hour game.

Don't think anyone is sitting around saying "man...this game should have finished minutes ago".

BS changes to things that aren't a problem
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#8
To take that one step farther, the league wide WHIP in 2017 was 1.34. So how often is the pitch clock even going to be in effect if teams average a baserunner per inning?


My estimate of 60% of pitches with the bases empty might be way high.
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#9
You were close. This year 57% of pitches thrown were with men on base.

Below is the yearly change to pace of play, as in the average number of seconds between pitches from the start of a game to its end.

2017: 23.8
2016: 22.7
2015: 22.1
2014: 23.0
2013: 22.6
2012: 22.1
2011: 21.6
2010: 21.5
2009: 21.4
2008: 21.6
2007: 21.5

So it's clearly risen, but not to the extent that major rule changes need to be implemented.
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#10
But what was it in 1980?

They have been concerned with stuff like this for more than 10 years now.
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#11
That's as far back as the data on Fangraphs goes.

There are a lot of different factors that lengthen a game today that have nothing to do with pitchers taking longer between pitches on the mound though. In 1980 there were 856 complete games thrown lol. It's a specialized bullpen game now, and pitching changes add a lot of time.

It wouldn't surprise me if the influx in infield shifts has also added a tick or two to game times.
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#12
question.

Is attendance down, or ratings low???

Why are they tinkering with such bullshite?
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#13
Revenues have risen 13 years in a row now. I believe attendance is down this decade compared to 2000-09 though. And the average viewer age of baseball fans is comparatively high.
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#14
I don't mind the idea of a pitch clock, I think 20 seconds is a little harsh though. 22 or 24 would be better IMO. You're trying to cut a bit of time, not change how the game is played. What would the penalty be anyways?
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#15
if the average time is already between 22 and 24, do you really need a clock to enforce it?
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#16
(2017-12-07, 12:32 AM)Chris D Wrote: if the average time is already between 22 and 24, do you really need a clock to enforce it?

Yes. Some pitchers average over 30.
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#17
(2017-12-07, 08:58 AM)thebest41587 Wrote:
(2017-12-07, 12:32 AM)Chris D Wrote: if the average time is already between 22 and 24, do you really need a clock to enforce it?

Yes. Some pitchers average over 30.

Very few pitchers get that high (only 3 cracked 30 seconds last year, only one above 31, and they threw a combined 176 innings) and the ones that do are relievers so the impact of a pitch clock would be minimal anyway as they usually only throw an inning or less and often times with men on base.
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