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Lufthansa sues passenger who skipped his flight
#1
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/lufth...index.html

(CNN) — A method commonly used by airline passengers to get cheaper fares is at the center of a court row between a German airline and one of its customers.
Lufthansa has taken a passenger, who didn't show up for the last leg of his ticketed journey, to court in an apparent bid to clamp down on "hidden city" ticketing.
The practice involves passengers leaving their journey at a layover point, instead of making a final connection.

For instance, someone flying from New York to San Francisco could book a cheaper trip from New York to Lake Tahoe with a layover in San Francisco and get off there, without bothering to take the last leg of the flight.
According to a court document, an unnamed male passenger booked a return flight from Oslo to Seattle, which had a layover in Frankfurt. The passenger used all legs of the outbound flight, but did not catch the Frankfurt to Oslo return flight. He instead flew on a separate Lufthansa reservation from Frankfurt to Berlin.
Compensation

[Image: http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam...-747-8.jpg]

Lufthansa's lawsuit aimed to target a "hidden city" loophole.
Lufthansa courtesy of AirlineRatings.com

Lufthansa saw this as a violation of their terms and conditions and is seeking €2,112 (around $2,385) in compensation.
A Berlin district court dismissed the lawsuit in December, but Lufthansa's spokesperson confirmed to CNN that the company has "already filed the appeal against the decision."

Back in 2014, United Airlines and Orbitz filed a civil lawsuit against 22-year-old Aktarer Zaman, who founded the website Skiplagged.com, which helps travelers find cheaper flights by using the "hidden city" strategy.
The case was thrown out in 2015 after the judge in the Northern District Court of Illinois said the court didn't have jurisdiction over the case because Zaman didn't live or do business in that city.
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#2
I don't really understand the airline's position here. The seat was paid for, if a passenger misses it.. oh well. I guess the airline would prefer to have filled it with ANOTHER paying customer, but thats kinda greedy imo
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#3
Very cool read, this whole hidden city strategy is interesting, didn't realize it was an issue
If you need a sign to stay alive tonight, this is it!
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#4
That's a genius maneuver by the passenger. The fact the airline sued them over it (after ALL the BS that airlines put customers through) is laughable.
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#5
Curious as to how the airline can differentiate between those using the hidden city trick and those who truly miss their flights.
Why is common sense not so common?
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#6
(2019-02-13, 11:51 AM)Ululator Wrote: Curious as to how the airline can differentiate between those using the hidden city trick and those who truly miss their flights.

They probably noticed it wasn't a one time thing for that customer.
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#7
This is BS. They got the amount they charge for the entire flight.

This would be like a cab charging to take a guy across town, the guy pays in full, and while enroute the guy goes "y'know what? Just drop me here"...and the cabbie complains that he should have somehow charged more for a shorter trip if he knew beforehand that the guy wanted to go to the destination he was going to pass on the way to the one he paid for.

I get the inconvenience of layovers and premium charged for direct flights, but this is just greed-based B.S on the part of the airline.

If you're going to make a scheduled stop where I want to end up, enroute to somewhere else, and I am willing to pay the exact price you charge to take me there and then somewhere else, and get off having flown less miles than I paid for? You're going to sue me? Fackin beat it.

Granted, I as the paying customer get the win here with a cheaper flight...but you don't lose either. I paid full-pop for a flight I didn't take for chrissakes.
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#8
I know sometimes a flight leaves a little early if everyone is confirmed onboard.
Would their upset be that they delay a flight slightly while making announcements to alert the missing passenger?

If so, then perhaps it could be insisted that a connecting passenger at least show up to inform that he won't be taking the flight.
What if climate change is a big hoax and we create a better, cleaner earth for nothing?
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#9
(2019-02-13, 11:51 AM)Ululator Wrote: Curious as to how the airline can differentiate between those using the hidden city trick and those who truly miss their flights.

A head count of passengers. Then the staff accounting for the "missing" passenger by comparing the passenger list to the seats assigned to each passenger.
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#10
This is crazy.The airline is saving money by carrying less weight of one less passenger for a shorter distance.
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#11
By that logic though Scotch, I could be sued for getting shitfaced in the airport bar, or hitting up a taco truck and becoming violently ill during my layover and missing my connecting flight.

If the premise for the suit is the inconvenience to the other passengers, due to a delayed departure time...anyone who doesn't show up to the airport without notifying them could be sued by an airline.

This appears to be a specific amount that the airline feels they lost, due to his scheming within their system, and they are trying to recoup the value in airfare that he should have paid to go where his ticket said he was going, not where he (conveniently for him) ended up while enroute to a cheaper destination.

This to me, is a "pick your battles" scenario for the airline. He didn't steal from you. He paid full price for his flight, and elected to get off early. To his benefit, to be sure, but not to your loss. He paid for a ticket/seat on the plane for the flight he elected to miss.

The lawsuit not only informs others of this rather clever way of saving on airfare, and also makes them look like assholes for suing a guy who paid full price, albeit for a cheaper ticket, that happened to have a layover in the destination he wanted to arrive in.

For the small percentage of people who actually take advantage of this loophole, surely this isn't an issue worth pursuing legally when weighed against the PR nightmare of "Airline vs Paying Customer".

To me, all it really suggests is that they're gouging people for direct flights.
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#12
By the airlines raising this issue it has me thinking about how I may have to check into doing this on my next flight!
What if climate change is a big hoax and we create a better, cleaner earth for nothing?
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#13
Before anyone tries this, its worth noting that you need to only have carry-on for that trip and no checked in luggage.

That said, a flight won't take off with luggage belonging to someone who isn't on the plane. So maybe you could get away with checking in luggage, purposely missing the flight, they pull your luggage off the plane, and then you go claim it. Hmm.. maybe this is what actually happened, and why the airline is suing now.
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#14
(2019-02-13, 02:13 PM)RyeRocks Wrote: Before anyone tries this, its worth noting that you need to only have carry-on for that trip and no checked in luggage.

That said, a flight won't take off with luggage belonging to someone who isn't on the plane.  So maybe you could get away with checking in luggage, purposely missing the flight, they pull your luggage off the plane, and then you go claim it.  Hmm.. maybe this is what actually happened, and why the airline is suing now.

Another thing to consider. If you do this on a return flight, they cancel your second leg. So 1 way only
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#15
Yes, very true dc. If you do it on your intial departure flights, your entire return flights will be cancelled unless you work with the airlines on what happened.

Years ago when I got stuck in zurich cuz of that icelandic volcano that was spewing ash everywhere, grounding all the euro flights for a week, I had a ticket home from Zurich to Munich to DC to Ottawa. I caught wind that the munich flight was going to take off, but the zurich one was not. I so took a train to munich to get on that leg. Fortunately I called the airlines ahead of doing so and they said you can't miss the first leg and just show up for the second leg, as the whole itinerary would have been cancelled on me.
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#16
(2019-02-13, 02:06 PM)Bo Dangles Wrote: By that logic though Scotch, I could be sued for getting shitfaced in the airport bar, or hitting up a taco truck and becoming violently ill during my layover and missing my connecting flight.

If the premise for the suit is the inconvenience to the other passengers, due to a delayed departure time...anyone who doesn't show up to the airport without notifying them could be sued by an airline.

This appears to be a specific amount that the airline feels they lost, due to his scheming within their system, and they are trying to recoup the value in airfare that he should have paid to go where his ticket said he was going, not where he (conveniently for him) ended up while enroute to a cheaper destination.

This to me, is a "pick your battles" scenario for the airline. He didn't steal from you. He paid full price for his flight, and elected to get off early. To his benefit, to be sure, but not to your loss. He paid for a ticket/seat on the plane for the flight he elected to miss.

The lawsuit not only informs others of this rather clever way of saving on airfare, and also makes them look like assholes for suing a guy who paid full price, albeit for a cheaper ticket, that happened to have a layover in the destination he wanted to arrive in.

For the small percentage of people who actually take advantage of this loophole, surely this isn't an issue worth pursuing legally when weighed against the PR nightmare of "Airline vs Paying Customer".

To me, all it really suggests is that they're gouging people for direct flights.

If they started suing customers for delaying flights, I imagine it would open the gets to customers suing for delayed flights. That would ruin the industry. Lufthansa has become such a joke. From their annual pilot’s strike, to their aggression towards passengers. Stfu and be a better airline.
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#17
Interesting video about the airline and airport business.  Might give some insight as to the possible issues...



"We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them" - Albert Einstein
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